Submitted Papers

 

Overview

 

The paper submission deadlines have now passed. A list of submitted papers with abstracts is below.

 

 

 

Abstracts of Submitted Papers

 

Cloud Computing and Lessons from the Past - Dr. Rao Mikkilineni & Vijay Sarathy, Kawa Objects, Inc.

 

 

The skyrocketing demand for a new generation of cloud‐based consumer and business applications is driving the need for next generation of datacenters that must be massively scalable, efficient, agile, reliable and secure. The authors see a parallel between the state of the datacenters today and the evolution of the Intelligent Network (IN) infrastructure in telecommunication. The telecommunications networks have for many years, demonstrated their ability to reliably enable network (voice) services creation, assurance and delivery on a massive scale.

 

Based on an analysis of the Intelligent Networks in telecommunications to identify proven concepts and key lessons that can be applied to enable next generation IT datacenters experience this paper asserts that:

 

  • In order to scale cloud services reliably to millions of service developers and billions of end users the next generation cloud computing and datacenter infrastructure will have to follow an evolution similar to the one that led to the creation of scalable telecommunication networks.

  • In the future network‐based cloud service providers will leverage virtualization technologies to be able to allocate just the right levels of virtualized compute, network and storage resources to individual applications based on real‐time business demand while also providing full service level assurance of availability, performance and security at a reasonable cost.

  • A key component ‐ identified in this paper as the Virtual Resource Mediation Layer (VRML), must be developed through industry collaboration to enable interoperability of various public and private clouds. This layer will form the basis for ensuring massive scalability of cloud infrastructure by enabling distributed service creation, service delivery and service assurance without any single vendor domination.

  • The next generation virtualization technologies must allow applications to dynamically access CPU, memory, bandwidth and storage (capacity, I/O and throughput) in a manner similar to that of the telecommunications 800 Service Call Model with one level of indirection and mediation.

The authors believe that the next generation cloud evolution is a fundamental transformation – and not just an evolutionary stack of XaaS implementations, which will enable global service collaboration networks utilizing optimally distributed and managed computing, network and storage resources driven in real‐time by business priorities.

 

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A Reference Model of Cloud Operating and Open Source Software Implementation Mapping - Wenke Ji, Jiangbo Ma, XiaoYong Ji

 

 

In this article, a reference model is proposed. The model divides the cloud computing system with various components in a 3-layer hierarchy called infrastructure, platform and application. The details of the components are presented for its functionality assumed. Also the open source software implementation for the components in the model is addressed.

 

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FCAPS in the Business Services Fabric Model - Pankaj Goyal, Senior Member, IEEE, Rao Mikkilineni, Murthy Ganti

 

 

The emergence of the next generation of computational environment, consisting of interoperable public clouds, private clouds and private infrastructures, will provide on-demand ubiquitous virtual resources. The delivery of business services over these ubiquitous virtual resources requires a reexamination of how these services are managed and delivered to assure appropriate levels of service availability, performance, security and cost. In addition, these business services maybe realized using public and private services that are able to utilize all or restricted types of virtual resources. The focus of this paper is the application to services of the well understood concepts of Fault, Configuration, Accounting, Performance and Security (FCAPS) management introduced in the Telecommunications Management Network (TMN). The paper proposes the incorporation of FCAPS management capabilities at a minimum into all services at a component level to enable end-to-end service management.

 

The FCAPS capabilities are realized through management policy, and managed through collaboration between agents implementing the FCAPS capability; a commonly used subset list of FCAPS capabilities – these can be individually or as a subgroup realized by service agents for incorporation in both managed and management service agents. The model does not mandate a centralized or distributed FCAPS management capability. The model does indicate that the management capabilities are required at every layer of the services environment.

 

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Smart Metering the Clouds - Tarry Singh, VMware vExpert and Cloud Technologist, tarry.singh@gmail.com Pavan Yara, Researcher and Cloud Technologist, ypavan@acm.org

 

 

As cloud computing becomes increasingly pervasive, the data center energy consumption attributable to cloud computing is climbing, despite the clarion call of action to reduce consumption and reverse environmental effects. At the same time, the rising cost of energy — due to regulatory measures enforcing a “true cost” of energy coupled with finite natural resources rapidly diminishing, resulting in scarcity — is refocusing IT leaders on efficiency and total cost of ownership (TCO), particularly in the context of the world-wide financial crisis. We propose a “smart metering” approach that encompasses all the stakeholders in the cloud computing ecosystem to achieve these twin goals of “energy conservation” and “demand response”. As such, this paper introduces our initial thoughts on “smart metering” and various implications and implementation ideas related to it.

 

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Manageability and Operability in the Business Services Fabric -Pankaj Goyal, Senior Member, IEEE, Rao Mikkilineni, Murthy Ganti

 

 

The focus of manageability and operability concerns for long has been the Information Technology (IT) infrastructure and capabilities. Over the years many proposals have been made for improving IT Services Management. In the new cloud environment, the users’ ability to manage service performance is limited at best; the situation would get worse when enterprises require a seamless integration of public and private clouds with their and their partners’ IT infrastructures. This paper proposes to focus attention on the manageability and operability of business services because in the end their performance affects business outcomes.

 

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Creating Next Generation Cloud Computing based Network Services and The Contributions of Social Cloud Operation Support System (OSS) to Society - Miyuki Sato, Fujitsu Co. Ltd, Japan

 

 

Emerging virtualization technologies are making ubiquitous access to on-demand computing, network and storage resources to deliver various applications over public Internet. In this paper we present how the telecom operation support systems (OSS) that provide Enterprise to Enterprise (E2E) transactions, switching management, on-demand service management and scalability have evolved to provide next generation cloud management. Fujitsu’s Social Cloud OSS provides multi-vendor, multi-network management, multi-layer Service Level Agreement (SLA) assurance, on-demand service management and impact analysis to businesses. The Social Cloud OSS service management solution for cloud computing will be the next killer application that will facilitate easy access to cloud services with appropriate SLAs and enable the society to use social networking applications that are currently being delivered using clouds.

 

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What Networking of Information Can Do for Cloud Computing -Börje Ohlman Anders Eriksson René Rembarz Borje.Ohlman@ericsson.com Anders.E.Eriksson@ericsson.com Rene.Rembarz@ericsson.com Ericsson Research

 

 

Cloud computing is making it possible to separate the process of building an infrastructure for service provisioning from the business of providing end user services. Today, such infrastructures are normally provided in large data centres and the applications are executed remotely from the users. One reason for this is that cloud computing requires a reasonably stable infrastructure and networking environment, largely due to management reasons. Networking of Information (NetInf) is an information centric networking paradigm that can support cloud computing by providing new possibilities for network transport and storage. It offers direct access to information objects through a simple API, independent of their location in the network. This abstraction can hide much of the complexity of storage and network transport systems that cloud computing today has to deal with. In this paper we analyze how cloud computing and NetInf can be combined to make cloud computing infrastructures easier to manage, and potentially enable deployment in smaller and more dynamic networking environments. NetInf should thus be understood as an enhancement to the infrastructure for cloud computing rather than a change to cloud computing technology as such. To illustrate the approach taken by NetInf, we also describe how it can be implemented by introducing a specific name resolution and routing mechanism.

 

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The Virtual Business Services Fabric: an integrated abstraction of Services and Computing Infrastructure - Pankaj Goyal, Ph.D. Senior Member, IEEE

 

 

This paper introduces (i) the concept of Business services as a fabric that is a network of networks consisting of service components; (ii) proposes partitioning and composition schemes for creating a virtualized services fabric; and (iii) an agent based infrastructure services fabric to implement knowledge based policies and business workflows. The proposed VBSF – a model for heterogeneous virtualization and abstraction of services, applications, policies, capabilities, resources, infrastructure and, even, people – allows dynamic allocation of resources and dynamic assembly (composition) of business workflows. This model is applicable to services and infrastructural environments that transcend public and private clouds, services, applications and infrastructures.

 

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Virtual Systems Workload Characterization - An Overview -Mohamed A. El-Refaey, Dr. Mohamed Abu Rizkaa Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Transport College of Computing & Information Technology Cairo - Egypt

 

 

Virtual systems and virtualization technology are taking the momentum nowadays in data centers and IT infrastructure models.  Performance analysis of such systems is very invaluable for enterprises but yet is not a deterministic process. Single workload benchmark is useful in quantifying the virtualization overhead within a single VM, but not useful in whole virtualized environment with multiple isolated VM and varying workload on each and can’t capture the system behavior.  We need a common workload model and methodology for virtualized systems so that benchmark results can be compared across different platforms.  In this paper we will present an overview of the key requirements and characteristics of virtual systems performance metrics and workload characterization which can be considered one step further in implementing virtual systems benchmark and performance model that describe the effect of the applications, host operating system and the hypervisor layer on the performance metrics of virtual workloads. An overview of Intel® vCon model and VMware VMmark will be introduced as examples for the consolidated servers’ workload evaluation.

 

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